Highlights:

  • When asked what they disliked most about their job, 30% said that there was no work-life balance, and 27% said that they felt that they spent more time “firefighting” than tackling important business challenges.
  • Thirty three percent of the 32% of respondents who said they were thinking about quitting their jobs indicated they would do so in the next six months, and 37% said they would be willing to leave their jobs in the next seven to twelve months.

According to a recent study, nearly a third of Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) and IT security managers in the US and the UK are considering leaving their present company.

Additionally, a third of workers said they’d leave their positions in the following six months.

To better understand the issues they faced in the face of escalating IT security threats and a shortage of qualified people in the field, the cybersecurity firm BlackFog polled more than 400 IT decision-makers at businesses in the US and UK with 500+ workers.

It was found that many IT security leaders find it challenging to keep up with the always-evolving threats and new cybersecurity tactics, in addition to reporting problems with recruiting, retention, and work-life balance that are prompting many to quit the company.

When asked what they disliked most about their job, 30% said there was no work-life balance, and 27% said they felt they spent more time “firefighting” than tackling fundamental business challenges.

In addition to the 32% of CISOs who stated that the demands of their jobs were forcing them to consider quitting, 52% admitted that they were having trouble keeping up with emerging frameworks and models like Zero Trust. Twenty percent indicated that having the proper skills on their team was a “serious challenge.”

Thirty-three percent of the 32% of respondents who said they were thinking about quitting their jobs indicated they would do so in the next six months, and 37% said they would be willing to leave their careers in the next seven to twelve months.

Given the rise in cybercrime and the severe lack of cybersecurity professionals, BlackFog’s research reflects growing concerns among cybersecurity leaders about their capacity to protect businesses and consumers.

It also draws attention to the tremendous strain cybersecurity workers experience, who are quitting the field more significantly because of stress, burnout, and health issues.

The BlackFog report contained a few tidbits of encouraging information. For instance, cybersecurity experts are finally reaching business executives: BlackFog’s survey found that 75% of respondents believed there is “full alignment” between board expectations and what CISOs can provide.

Sixty-four percent of respondents claimed they could finish their top priorities within the first six months of beginning their job. BlackFog discovered that CISOs are happy with the average of 27% of IT spending going towards security budgets.

Additionally, CISOs report feeling purposeful in their jobs: According to 44% of poll participants, the best part is ‘protecting’ the business and ensuring that employees work in secure surroundings.

While the job of a cybersecurity leader comes with “huge challenges and enormous pressures,” according to Darren Williams, CEO and founder of BlackFog, there are “encouraging signals” that managers are paying attention to their worries and setting their budgets and business priorities appropriately.